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1. My Mother on an Evening in Late Summer (original setting for voice, oboe & piano)

My Mother on an Evening in Late Summer (original setting for voice, oboe & piano)

"My Mother on an Evening in Late Summer" is a musical setting of the poem by Mark Strand. It's performed here by baritone Aaron Engebreth, oboist Jane Harrison, and pianist Jun Toguchi (Jim Donahue, recording engineer). Past performances include its New York premiere at Janice Mayer & Associates Tenth Anniversary celebration to benefit Classical Action, held at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Dizzy's Club overlooking Central Park. It was performed by tenor Carl Halvorson, pianist Anthony Fogg of the Boston Symphony, and oboist Stephen Taylor of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. A new transcription for voice, oboe, harp & string quartet was premiered May 21 and 22, 2016 in Cambridge and Concord, Massachusetts by the Sarasa Chamber Music Ensemble. A recording of that performance appears on the composer's SoundCloud page under the heading "transcribed for voice, oboe, harp & string quartet." ----- RECORDING Aaron Engebreth, baritone Jane Harrison, oboe Jun Toguchi, piano James T. Donahue, recording engineer Bernadette Horgan, page turner Recorded at Sonic Temple, Roslindale, MA November 24, 2002 ---- COMPOSER'S WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm VIDEO OF THIS WORK www.youtube.com/watch?v=atVLROjFx1U ---- MY MOTHER ON AN EVENING IN LATE SUMMER by Mark Strand (1980) music by Tom Vignieri (1986) Text used with kind permission from Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. 1 When the moon appears and a few wind-stricken barns stand out in the low-domed hills and shine with a light that is veiled and dust-filled and that floats upon the fields, my mother, with her hair in a bun, her face in shadow, and the smoke from her cigarette coiling close to the faint yellow sheen of her dress, stands near the house and watches the seepage of late light down through the sedges, the last gray islands of cloud taken from view, and the wind ruffling the moon's ash-colored coat on the black bay. 2 Soon the house, with its shades drawn closed, will send small carpets of lampglow into the haze and the bay will begin its loud heaving and the pines, frayed finials climbing the hill, will seem to graze the dim cinders of heaven. And my mother will stare into the starlanes, the endless tunnels of nothing, and as she gazes, under the hour's spell, she will think how we yield each night to the soundless storms of decay that tear at the folding flesh, and she will not know why she is here or what she is prisoner of if not the conditions of love that brought her to this. 3 My mother will go indoors and the fields, the bare stones will drift in peace, small creatures -- the mouse and the swift -- will sleep at opposite ends of the house. Only the cricket will be up, repeating its one shrill note to the rotten boards of the porch, to the rusted screens, to the air, to the rimless dark, to the sea that keeps to itself. Why should my mother awake? The earth is not yet a garden about to be turned. The stars are not yet bells that ring at night for the lost. It is much too late. --------- ******

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2. There Will Come Soft Rains

There Will Come Soft Rains

THERE WILL COME SOFT RAINS by Tom Vignieri "There Will Come Soft Rains" is a treble choir and string orchestra setting of the poem by Sara Teasdale which she wrote in the wake of World War I. Poignant and powerful, Teasdale speaks of nature reclaiming a world devastated by war. Recorded here in Symphony Hall, Boston, it was commissioned by the Chamber Music Connection and the Columbus Children's Choir of central Ohio for the New American Music Project with support from the Johnstone Fund for New Music. It was premiered March 6, 2010 at Denison University in Granville, Ohio under the direction of Deborah Barrett Price and Sandra Mathias. "There Will Come Soft Rains" was published in Teasdale's 1920 collection "Flame and Shadow." In 1918 her book of poems "Love Songs" had been awarded the Columbia University Poetry Prize which later became the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. ----- THERE WILL COME SOFT RAINS Sara Teasdale (1884-1933) There will come soft rains and the smell of the ground, And swallows circling with their shimmering sound; And frogs in the pools singing at night, And wild plum-trees in tremulous white; Robins will wear their feathery fire, Whistling their whims on a low-fence wire; And not one will know of the war, not one Will care at last when it is done. Not one would mind, neither bird nor tree If mankind perished utterly; And Spring herself, when she woke at dawn, Would scarcely know that we were gone. ----- AUDIO RECORDING Grant Llewellyn, conductor James Donahue & Nick Squire, recording engineers Editing by Nick Squire Mixing by James Donahue & Nick Squire Assisted by Debbie Price, Yoichi Udagawa & Neal Hampton with thanks to Chris Ruigomez, Claes Nystrom & Kathryn Kucharski Recorded November 3, 2013, Symphony Hall, Boston ----- MUSIC VIDEO OF THIS WORK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aC-mUhc2c3E COMPOSER'S WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm ----- SOPRANO Roberta Anderson Susan Consoli Jessica Cooper Cassandra Extavour Monica Hatch Shannon Larkin Jill Malin Shea Mavros Wendy Perrotta Emily Tweedy ALTO Julia Cavallaro Carrie Cheron Mary Gerbi Katherine Growdon Margaret Lias Krista River Claire Shepro VIOLIN 1 Anna Lee Gigi Turgeon Brian Hong Claire Bourg Clayton Penrose-Whitmore Laura Liu VIOLIN 2 Haruno Sato Sherri Zhang Amelia Sie Etienne Girard Harriet Langley VIOLA Debbie Price Erin Nolan Nao Kubota Jinsun Hong CELLO Guy Fishman Michael Dahlberg Jonah Ellsworth Taeguk Mun BASS Kiyoe Wellington Michael McClure Nash Tomey ----- The image used above is from a painting by Alfred Bastien called "Canadian Gunners in the Mud." It depicts the Belgian battlefield Passchendaele in 1917 where terrible shelling and constant rain reduced it to a sea of mud and devastation. ....... -------

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3. An American Hymn

An American Hymn

AN AMERICAN HYMN by Tom Vignieri "An American Hymn" was commissioned by Yoichi Udagawa and the Melrose Symphony Orchestra and premiered in March 2001. It was recorded in October of that year with a freelance orchestra in Symphony Hall, Boston. By then the dramatic events of September 11 had unfolded and for some the piece took on additional meaning. Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy played an archival recording of the premiere at agency meetings in Washington, and it was later featured on a 10th anniversary memorial concert given by JoAnn Falletta and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra. But it was written as a look back on 20th century America and in homage to the composer’s parents, Charles and Lorraine, who came of age during the Great Depression and World War II. It’s meant to evoke the quiet strength and nobility of those who came from hardship and went on to rebuild the country and their lives. While introducing the piece at a Buffalo Philharmonic concert, Maestra Falletta remarked that “It's really about what is best of the spirit of our country; the courage, the strength, and the hope that we all have. Even in difficult times.” Like a hymn, the music is prayer-like and strophic with each subsequent “verse” commenting and expanding on the central musical idea. It opens with solemn brass and culminates in a final chorale featuring the entire orchestra. It’s been taken up by a number of conductors over the years including Keitaro Harada of the Cincinnati and Richmond symphonies (who included it on his recent debut program with the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra), and Steven Reineke, conductor of The New York Pops. In addition, a wind symphony arrangement made by James Ripley was performed by Captain Richard Winkels and the U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own” on the West Steps of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. It was most recently performed by Francisco Noya and the New Philharmonia Orchestra of Newton, MA on March 25 and 26, 2017. ----- RECORDING Julian Wacher, conductor Boston Sinfonietta James Donahue, recording engineer Mixing by Thomas Stephenson Recorded October 29, 2001, Symphony Hall, Boston ----- COMPOSER'S WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm ----- The image above is of Franconia Notch in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. ***** --------

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4. The Tides

The Tides

THE TIDES Music by Tom Vignieri Poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) “The Tides” was commissioned by Steven Karidoyanes and the Masterworks Chorale of Boston in celebration of their 75th anniversary season. It was premiered in Sanders Theatre at Harvard University on May 8, 2015. A setting for chorus and orchestra of the sonnet by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, it was featured on a program that included Handel’s Coronation Anthems and Haydn’s Lord Nelson Mass and scored for the forces available: 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 3 trumpets, timpani, strings and SATB choir. Longfellow's lyric poetry, known for its musicality, struck me as ideal and “The Tides” seemed to contain everything the moment required. A rich evocation of an iconic coastal scene with words and celebratory expressions that serve as a metaphor for constancy and renewal. Given the occasion and the Chorale’s standing as a leading chorus in the region, it seemed fitting to set a poem by a New England native and someone of Longfellow’s stature. In fact near the end of his life the celebrated poet and Harvard professor of modern languages was honored in the very same Sanders Theatre which had been newly constructed in the 1870s. The music reflects the changing mood of the text which begins darkly and slowly builds and brightens with the “tumultuous roar” of the returning tide. ----- THE TIDES (1874) By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow I saw the long line of the vacant shore, The sea-weed and the shells upon the sand, And the brown rocks left bare on every hand, As if the ebbing tide would flow no more. Then heard I, more distinctly than before, The ocean breathe and its great breast expand, And hurrying came on the defenceless land The insurgent waters with tumultuous roar. All thought and feeling and desire, I said, Love, laughter, and the exultant joy of song Have ebbed from me forever! Suddenly o'er me They swept again from their deep ocean bed, And in a tumult of delight, and strong As youth, and beautiful as youth, upbore me. ----- PREMIERE/RECORDING Masterworks Chorale and Orchestra Steven Karidoyanes, music director and conductor Recorded in Sanders Theatre at Harvard University by Ken Silber Post-production mixing and mastering by James Donahue of Whiskey Lane Productions ----- MUSIC VIDEO OF THIS WORK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqWBH9FVNrY COMPOSER'S WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm ....... -------

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5. To Sing

To Sing

TO SING by Tom Vignieri text by Charles Anthony Silvestri Set for a cappella SATB choir, "To Sing" is the first of 2 movements from a piece commissioned by Carthage College in tribute to President F. Gregory Campbell and First Lady Barbara Campbell. Recorded here in Symphony Hall, Boston it was premiered May 18, 2012 by the Carthage Choir and Wind Orchestra in Siebert Chapel under the direction of Eduardo Garcia-Novelli and James Ripley. A transformative figure, President Campbell retired from the college in 2012 after 25 years of service. It was written in collaboration with poet Charles Anthony Silvestri, known for his work with composers of contemporary choral music such as Eric Whitacre. Silvestri took various writings and speeches of the president and transformed his ideas, imagery and words of wisdom into a 14-line sonnet. Though universal in nature, the sonnet is written from the perspective of the student who learns from mentor voices and is challenged "to make no little plans, to dream, to dare" and to "make the world a better place." The principal motive is based upon the combined initials of Mr. and Mrs. Campbell: F-G-C-B. ----- CAMPBELL SONNET by Charles Anthony Silvestri When faced with many questions, trials, and doubt, When choices loom before us, challenging, We try to understand what life's about, To know what paths to take, what words to sing. We hear the many mentor voices call, Reminding us to make all choices good. We feel their reassurance when we fall, Whenever we do other than we should. So, nurtured thus, this sacred fire we bear. Our quest: to learn, to journey, and to grow, To make no little plans, to dream, to dare, To sing our stories so that all can know: This human life appears for such short space, So LIVE, and make the world a better place. ----- RECORDING Grant Llewellyn, conductor James Donahue & Nick Squire, recording engineers Editing by Nick Squire Mixing by James Donahue & Nick Squire Assisted by Yoichi Udagawa and Neal Hampton with special thanks to Jesse Levine, Chris Ruigomez and Dr. Peter Dennee Recorded November 3, 2013, Symphony Hall, Boston ----- COMPOSER WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm VIDEO OF THIS WORK https://youtu.be/SWZMZr0CPgo 2ND MOVEMENT: "TO JOURNEY" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lS6iuKMnmC0 ----- SOPRANO Roberta Anderson Susan Consoli Jessica Cooper Cassandra Extavour Monica Hatch Shannon Larkin Jill Malin Shea Mavros Wendy Perrotta Emily Tweedy ALTO Julia Cavallaro Carrie Cheron Mary Gerbi Katherine Growdon Margaret Lias *Krista River Claire Shepro TENOR Jonas Budris Josh Collier Craig Hanson Eric Perry Jason Wang Mark Williams BASS Jonathan Barnhart Glenn Billingsley RaShaun Campbell Jacob Cooper Thomas Dawkins Clifford Rust *soloist ----- The image above is from the recording session in Symphony Hall, Boston. ....... -------

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6. Sonus Lux (midi recording)

Sonus Lux (midi recording)

This midi recording has been uploaded for the benefit of the Melrose Symphony which is giving the premiere November 4, 2017 at Memorial Hall in Melrose, Massachusetts. The audio is computer generated and should be used for reference only as it’s not fully representative of the music as performed live in the concert hall. To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Melrose Symphony I wanted to write a piece that was luminous and ecstatic in nature, hence the title “Sonus Lux” which translates from the Latin as “Sound Light.” It’s for large orchestra including a number of auxiliary winds, percussion, 2 harps, piano and organ. The outer sections are meant to represent a brilliant, iridescent light that shimmers and changes, reflecting the excitement of the moment and the modern world in which we live. While the inner, quieter section harkens to the orchestra’s origins. To achieve the latter I use fragments of a melody written around the time the orchestra was founded a century ago, which itself is based on a hymn from the 1800s. Both pieces are by New England composers which hopefully strengthens the connection to the orchestra and its history. The original hymn, "Dorrance," is by Isaac B. Woodbury, a 19th century composer and publisher of church music from Beverly, Massachusetts. In the 1910s Charles Ives used Woodbury's hymn as the basis for his piece "The Housatonic at Stockbridge" from "Three Places in New England." Fragments of Ives's music emerge and disappear in a slow reverie that features various members of the orchestra in solo roles. Woodbury’s hymn is later quoted in its entirety by a brass quintet. The return of the opening music brings us back into the present. This time brighter and even more joyous. ----- COMPOSER WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm ***** *****

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7. My Mother on an Evening in Late Summer (transcribed for voice, oboe, harp & string quartet)

My Mother on an Evening in Late Summer (transcribed for voice, oboe, harp & string quartet)

This setting of "My Mother on an Evening in Late Summer" was commissioned by the Sarasa Chamber Music Ensemble and premiered May 21, 2016 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It's based on the composer's work for voice, oboe & piano from 1986. Mark Strand’s evocative poem provides the framework for the piece which mirrors the tripartite structure of the text. I’m drawn to poetry that combines natural beauty with powerful meaning. (Other examples include "There Will Come Soft Rains" by Sara Teasdale, a poem which speaks of nature reclaiming a world devastated by war; and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's "The Tides," a rich evocation of an iconic coastal scene that serves as a metaphor for constancy and renewal.) Here Strand places his mother in a scene that is both vivid and poignant. It's almost mystical given the languid, metaphorical nature of her surroundings and the existential questions she faces. We find her soberly contemplating her life “on an evening in late summer” as it were. For her the day is late and she wonders how she’s come to this moment “if not for the conditions of love that brought her to this.” Like her, we all make choices we hope will bring some measure of happiness. Though we cannot fully know the consequences of those choices until we've lived them. It’s a dramatic and moving reflection by the poet son. Mark Strand was named U.S. Poet Laureate in 1990 though he was born on Prince Edward Island in Canada’s maritime provinces. Given the poem’s imagery, his birthplace strikes me as having informed the setting and is reminiscent to me of where I grew up in rural Wisconsin near Lake Michigan. It’s Strand's ability to convey the poignancy of the human condition however which I most sought to reflect in the music. ----- MY MOTHER ON AN EVENING IN LATE SUMMER by Mark Strand (1980) music by Tom Vignieri (1986 and 2016) Text used with kind permission from Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Aaron Engebreth, baritone Peggy Pearson, oboe Franziska Huhn, harp Christina Day Martinson & Haldan Martinson, violins Jenny Stirling, viola Jennifer Morsches, cello audio recording by Aaron Leclerc mixing and mastering by James Donahue Friends Meeting House, Cambridge, MA First Parish Church, Concord, MA ----- COMPOSER WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm VIDEO OF THIS WORK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atVLROjFx1U ----- 1 When the moon appears and a few wind-stricken barns stand out in the low-domed hills and shine with a light that is veiled and dust-filled and that floats upon the fields, my mother, with her hair in a bun, her face in shadow, and the smoke from her cigarette coiling close to the faint yellow sheen of her dress, stands near the house and watches the seepage of late light down through the sedges, the last gray islands of cloud taken from view, and the wind ruffling the moon's ash-colored coat on the black bay. 2 Soon the house, with its shades drawn closed, will send small carpets of lampglow into the haze and the bay will begin its loud heaving and the pines, frayed finials climbing the hill, will seem to graze the dim cinders of heaven. And my mother will stare into the starlanes, the endless tunnels of nothing, and as she gazes, under the hour's spell, she will think how we yield each night to the soundless storms of decay that tear at the folding flesh, and she will not know why she is here or what she is prisoner of if not the conditions of love that brought her to this. 3 My mother will go indoors and the fields, the bare stones will drift in peace, small creatures -- the mouse and the swift -- will sleep at opposite ends of the house. Only the cricket will be up, repeating its one shrill note to the rotten boards of the porch, to the rusted screens, to the air, to the rimless dark, to the sea that keeps to itself. Why should my mother awake? The earth is not yet a garden about to be turned. The stars are not yet bells that ring at night for the lost. It is much too late. --------- ******

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8. To Journey

To Journey

TO JOURNEY by Tom Vignieri "To Journey" is the 2nd movement of a work commissioned by Carthage College in honor of President F. Gregory Campbell and First Lady Barbara Campbell. Recorded here in Symphony Hall, Boston it was premiered May 18, 2012 by the Carthage Choir and Wind Orchestra in Siebert Chapel under the direction of Eduardo Garcia-Novelli and James Ripley. Whereas the first movement "To Sing" is set for a cappella choir, "To Journey" adds the services of a wind ensemble. Using a motive from the 1st movement as processional, the orchestra embarks on a journey through the centuries, referencing iconic hymns along the way. Given President Campbell’s 25-year tenure and what was the college’s 165th anniversary, it’s meant as a symbolic march through time, speaking to things of enduring quality. As the journey processes, each hymn, fragmented and reminiscent, is linked by variations on the processional idea. Given the college’s Lutheran affiliation, Martin Luther's "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" (1529) is the starting point, continuing with a chorale from J.S. Bach's St. Matthew Passion (1727), "Wenn ich einmal soll scheiden" (When once I must depart). We then move into 20th century hymnody with "For All The Saints" or "Sine Nomine" by Ralph Vaughan Williams, taken from the English Hymnal which he edited in 1906. The college newspaper, The Carthaginian, also used "For All The Saints" as the title of a recurring section of its publication. After spanning nearly four centuries we find ourselves in the present marked by the return of the Campbell theme from the 1st movement(at 5:20), stated plaintively in the winds. The brass and choir reprise the closing moments of the 1st movement along with final line of Charles Anthony Silvestri's sonnet. This time transforming from “So LIVE, and make the world a better place” to “So SING, and make the world a better place.” Lasting advice from President Campbell and an invitation to sing our learning and wisdom for the betterment of all. ----- RECORDING Grant Llewellyn, conductor James Donahue & Nick Squire, recording engineers Editing by Nick Squire Mixing by James Donahue & Nick Squire Assisted by Yoichi Udagawa & Neal Hampton with special thanks to Jesse Levine, Claes Nystrom, Chris Ruigomez and Dr. Peter Dennee Recorded November 3, 2013, Symphony Hall, Boston ----- COMPOSER WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm VIDEO OF THIS WORK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lS6iuKMnmC0 1ST MOVEMENT "TO SING" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWZMZr0CPgo ----- FLUTE Vanessa Holroyd Jessica Lizak OBOE Jane Harrison Andrea Bonsignore CLARINET Ivan Valbuena Paet Luz Elena Sarmiento Lozoda BASSOON Greg Newton HORN Lee Wadenpfuhl Ellen Martins TRUMPET Bruce Hall Jesse Levine Paul Perfetti TROMBONE Bob Couture Hans Bohn Brian Kay, bass PERCUSSION Jeff Fischer Rich Flanagan Craig McNutt Neil Grover, timpani SOPRANO Roberta Anderson Susan Consoli Jessica Cooper Cassandra Extavour Monica Hatch Shannon Larkin Jill Malin Shea Mavros Wendy Perrotta Emily Tweedy ALTO Julia Cavallaro Carrie Cheron Mary Gerbi Katherine Growdon Margaret Lias Krista River Claire Shepro TENOR Jonas Budris Josh Collier Craig Hanson Eric Perry Jason Wang Mark Williams BASS Jonathan Barnhart Glenn Billingsley RaShaun Campbell Jacob Cooper Thomas Dawkins Clifford Rust ----- The image above is from the recording session in Symphony Hall, Boston. ....... -------

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9. Note4Note

Note4Note

“Note4Note” was specially commissioned by the NPR program “From the Top” as the focus of a fundraising campaign to benefit the best young classical musicians in America. The idea was to create a piece by writing a note for every dollar (or note) given. Many thousands of dollars were donated so many thousands of notes were written! The resulting music is premiered here by two terrific alums of the "From the Top" radio and television programs: rising violinist Chad Hoopes and 11-year-old keyboard whiz Theo Luu. Love and thanks to Tim Banker, Jodi Beznoska, Austin Boyer, Shirley Barkai, Erin Nolan, Tessa Lark, Michael Thurber, Theresa Luu, Lilit Karapetian-Shougarian, Noah Craigwell and Yoichi Udagawa for their invaluable assistance in bringing this piece to life. ----- COMPOSER WEBSITE www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm VIDEO OF THIS WORK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANVL6pVllok ------ ****

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10. CumuloNimbus

CumuloNimbus

"CumuloNimbus" is a string quartet & string orchestra transcription of the final movement of the composer’s Sonata for 2 Pianos. It was commissioned by Deborah Barrett Price and the Chamber Music Connection (CMC) of Columbus, Ohio with support from the Johnstone Fund for New Music. The premiere was given by the Calidore String Quartet and an all-star ensemble of CMC musicians at the Southern Theatre on January 16, 2016, presented by Chamber Music Columbus. The title of the work is derived from the towering cloud formation which is charged with electricity and produces heavy rainfall. Its powerful upward air currents and thunderous downpours serving as a physical representation of the music. The word “CumuloNimbus” also happens to contain within it the letters to the name of the host city, “Columbus,” which is responsible for its creation. ----- Recording and image courtesy of Stephen Webster COMPOSER WEBSITE www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm MUSIC VIDEO OF THIS WORK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFkdrAVc064 ------ ****

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11. Psalm 3

Psalm 3

Psalm 3 is for unaccompanied SATB choir and was written for the Carthage Choir in 1983. It's dedicated to soprano Doris Lichty who, together with mezzo Theresa Clickner, movingly sing the following words: "I lie down and sleep; I wake again for the Lord sustains me." ----- COMPOSER WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm ***** *****

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12. Hodie Christus natus est

Hodie Christus natus est

HODIE CHRISTUS NATUS EST by Tom Vignieri Handel and Haydn Society Grant Llewellyn, conductor Christòpheren Nomura, baritone John Finney, organ The Latin text "Hodie Christus natus est" (Today Christ is born) comes from the vesper service for Christmas day and is set here for SATB choir, organ and baritone soloist. It was specially commissioned by conductor Grant Llewellyn for the Handel and Haydn Society recording "All is Bright" on the Avie label which debuted at No.8 on the Billboard Classical Albums chart. The piece itself received special mention in record reviews by Gramophone Magazine, The Daily Telegraph, The Boston Globe and Classics Today (http://tomvignieri.com/hodie_reviews.htm) with the following excerpt appearing in Classical Source, UK: "....Several other pieces deserve particular mention. William Walton's 'King Herod,' Eric Whitacre's luminescent 'Lux Aurumque,' and Ned Rorem's simply beautiful 'While All Things Were In Quiet Silence.' But more noteworthy than even these is the last item on the disc, commissioned for the recording. Tom Vignieri's 'Hodie Christus natus est' is an impressive and captivating work, with an exciting and challenging organ accompaniment and text-setting that cannot fail to draw in the listener. The choir's performance is evidence, were any needed, that its members are more than up to the challenge of contemporary music, instilling it with palpable enjoyment and brilliant tonal variations that perfectly match the well-judged proportions of the work." Subsequent arrangements of the organ accompaniment have been made by the composer for full orchestra, for brass quintet, for organ & brass ensemble, and an arrangement featuring children's chorus in the solo role. The orchestral arrangement was most recently performed by the Cape Ann Symphony (Mass.) as part of their 2016 holiday concerts. It has been performed by various ensembles including The Washington Chorus at the Kennedy Center, and as part of a national Christmas Day broadcast by CBC Radio in Canada. Both under the direction of conductor Julian Wachner. ----- TEXT Hodie Christus natus est: hodie Salvator apparuit: hodie in terra canunt Angeli, lætantur Archangeli: hodie exsultant justi, dicentes: Gloria in excelsis Deo, et in terra pax hominibus bonæ voluntatis. Alleluia! TRANSLATION Today Christ is born: today the Savior has appeared: today the Angels sing, the Archangels rejoice: today the righteous rejoice, saying: Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace and good will towards men. Alleluia! ----- COMPOSER WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm ----- RECORDING and IMAGE The recording was made in April 2005 at Methuen Memorial Music Hall in Methuen, Massachusetts using the historic Boston Music Hall "Great Organ" seen in the photo above (Aeolian-Skinner and E.F. Walker Co), at one time the largest pipe organ in the U.S. To purchase: http://cart.handelandhaydn.org/auxiliary/PSDetail.aspx?psn=126 It was also processed and rendered for 10.2 surround sound by Tomlinson Holman, inventor of the Lucasfilm THX sound system, and Chris Kyriakakis at the University of Southern California IMSC Immersive Audio Laboratory, in collaboration with recording engineer James Donahue. It’s available for demonstration at the IMSC Immersive Audio Lab. ....... -------

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13. Haec dies

Haec dies

HAEC DIES by Tom Vignieri A setting of the traditional Latin text “This is the day" for SATB choir, organ, and trumpet. It was commissioned by Lisa Graham and the Metropolitan Chorale of Brookline in celebration of their new name (formerly Brookline Chorus) and premiered November 19, 2011 at First Church in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ----- TRANSLATION Haec dies quam fecit Dominus: exsultemus et laetemur in ea. Allelulia. This is the day the Lord has made: let us be glad and rejoice in it. Allelulia. ----- RECORDING Metropolitan Chorale of Brookline Lisa Graham, music director and conductor Jesse Levine, trumpet Heinrich Christensen, organ Antonio Oliart, recording engineer This recording was made December 6, 2011 at All Saints Parish in Brookline, Massachusetts. With thanks to Donald Teeters and Peggy Maguire of All Saints Parish. ----- MUSIC VIDEO OF THIS WORK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9mxxxMy2Jg COMPOSER'S WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm ----- The image above is of Westminster Abbey in London, England. ……. -------

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14. The Torch Of Love

The Torch Of Love

THE TORCH OF LOVE by Tom Vignieri Based on a poem by Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), "The Torch of Love" was written at the request of the Amherst family for the 50th wedding anniversary of Ann & Nigel Amherst of Devon, England. In addition to SATB choir it was scored for various instruments played by family members: violin, cello, bass and alto saxophone. It was re-scored here for clarinet & string quintet and recorded by the Carthage Chamber Singers and Fifth House Ensemble under the direction of Peter Dennee. ----- THE TORCH OF LOVE The torch of Love dispels the gloom Of life, and animates the tomb; But never let it idly flare On gazers in the open air, Nor turn it quite away from one To whom it serves for moon and sun, And who alike in night or day Without it could not find his way. ----- RECORDING James Donahue & Nick Squire, recording engineers Editing by Nick Squire Mixing by James Donahue & Nick Squire Assisted by Cameron Kirkpatrick With thanks to the Dome Chapel in Renswoude, The Netherlands Recorded February 13, 2012, Siebert Chapel, Carthage College ----- COMPOSER'S WEBSITE http://www.tomvignieri.com/bio.htm ....... -------

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15. Sonus Lux (live excerpt)

Sonus Lux (live excerpt)

The final 2.5 minutes of the Melrose Symphony premiere of "Sonus Lux," recorded with a hand-held device in Memorial Hall, Melrose, Massachusetts. The piece is scored for large orchestra and organ: 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timp+3, 2 harps, piano, organ, strings

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